Primulas in Summer (2014)

Yes, the three-year-old Primula vialii seedling in the peat bed did produce its first flowers this summer. Here are several pictures (too many), and then some of the other July Primroses — P japonica, P alpicola, the last of the P sieboldii, and Dodecatheon dentatum — and then a few Primula seedlings flowering out of season.

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Primula vialii is a small plant in my garden.  The tallest leaf is no more than 12 cm.

The flower head, when it first appears, is tiny and pale.

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As the stem lengthens, the calyces expand and colour deepens.

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Now high above the leaves, light purple flowers emerge from the red calyces.

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P vialii 27-07-14

In the same bed (cool, moist, lightly shaded), the Primula japonica, much increased over last year (their first), are large enough now to produce multiple tiers of blossoms.

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My first Primula alpicola, its fourth year in flower, is now a large plant. When I divide it this fall, I’ll replant it nearer the front of the bed. Alpicolas should be grown where their fragrance can be appreciated.

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This year, some new plants bloomed: lighter blue, violet, pale yellow, and pink.

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A few of the Primula sieboldii continued blooming into July.

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This white shooting star, Dodecatheon dentatum, looks something like a small hosta. It might flower better if its life were a little less easy. I may divide it and try it in the rock garden.

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My nursery-raised Primula rusbyi bloom in alternate years. This was an off year. I now have several seed-grown P rusbyi, as well. This one was planted in the alpine pan last fall.  P rusbyi are spring bloomers, but this seedling reached flowering size in late summer. Next year, it should have its flowers in May or June.
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Another late-blooming seedling, a little Primula spectabilis in the alpine bed.

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These hybrid Primula acaulis seedlings are flowering not only out of season, but only 6 or 7 months from sowing. Primrose seedlings normally have their first flowering after their first winter. Will these ones be hardy enough to survive a zone 3 winter?

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