Primulas in Late June (2014)

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Here are pictures of plants that flowered in the latter half of the month.

 

Primula cortusoides in the peat bed.

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A white form of Primula matthioli. See a better one (better plant, better picture) on the cover of the Summer 2014 issue of the American Primrose Society‘s quarterly.

And its leaves:

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P. matthioli again, a purple form:

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Dodecatheon meadia. There were many this year, as the original plant has sown seeds throughout the peat bed.

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Later in the month, with Primula sieboldii:

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Another dodecatheon, perhaps also D. meadia, but I don’t think so.  This was grown from seed labelled Primula parryi. Last summer, when my P. parryi seedlings dried up and disappeared, I thought I had lost them (killed them/let them die). It turned out they had dried up and disappeared because they were Dodecatheons, which go dormant in late summer. I don’t think this is D. meadia because it flowered in its second spring, while my D. meadia seedlings take two or three full years to root in before they produce flowers.

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A pale mauve form of D. meadia.

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I’m not sure what this is. Primula munroi? It sprang up in a space briefly occupied by a plant purchased as Primula fasciculata. Last year, there was no sign of the alleged Primula fasciculata (save the little stake that bears its name). And this year, here is this new plant.

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Primula polyneura is undervalued, possibly because it lacks a pretty or romantic “common” name. Who wouldn’t want a garden full of orchid primroses, candelabra primroses, pagoda primroses, and moonlight primroses? But what kind of primrose is a Primula polyneura? It sounds too much like an unwelcome medical diagnosis.

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Primula sieboldii is, for me, the last of the section Cortusoides Primulas to flower.  It also flowers over a longer period than P. polyneura and P. matthioli.

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This is a Primula vialii I grew from seed sown in 2011, I think. At the end of summer 2012, I planted around a dozen little seedlings into the peat bed. Last year, I had three hardy survivors. This year, I have two. One is over-shadowed by Primula alpicola, and this is the other. Is it a big enough plant to flower this year?

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Here is my old store-bought P. vialli (“Pagoda Primrose”). It flowered for three years, but this year needs to be moved. Expanding Siberian iris and Muscari bulbs are too much competition for it. (The light brown stick is last year’s flower stem.)

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There appears to be three little plants, as well as lots of very good looking roots (now in a pot).DSCN0493

 

Finally, the first of the last Primulas of this year: Primula alpicola and Primula japonica. More of them to come in a later entry.

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