Devonian Botanic Garden, 4th June 2013, part 2

Today we hit bottom. Our normal temperatures reached their lowest: -8 day/-19 night. Here we’ll sit, in the bleak midwinter, for four weeks, before the normals start upward again. Lots of time to look at pictures of spring.

This set of photos takes us back to the Patrick Seymour Alpine Garden, where we find a team of weeders at work (three cheers!). Theirs is a big job. Overheard: they don’t pull out dead-looking plants (plants that belong in the garden, that is) but make a note of them and give them another year’s chance.

Weeders

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I saw a few dead-looking Haberlea rhodopensis, and one very much alive. Growing alongside a bolder, it is sheltered from too much sun and its roots can find moisture. Last year, we saw this plant in bud. This year, a little later in the season, we find it in full bloom.

Haberlea rhodopensis

Haberlea rhodopensis

Haberlea rhodopensis is a gesneriad, like our indoor Streptocarpus. I have requested seed from the BC Alpine Garden Club. I should know in a few days whether I’ve been lucky enough to get some. (Click on the pictures to see them full-size. They are not great, as I couldn’t get very close to the plant, wanting to stay on the path while the weeders were nearby, and I didn’t have my camera properly set for the light and distance.)

Haberlea rhodopensis

Haberlea rhodopensis

Haberlea rhodopensis

Haberlea rhodopensis

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Here are a couple more little plants sheltering beside boulders. The first sign says Saxifraga hostii, the second Androsace villosa. I have seen a Soldanella tucked up against one of these boulders, but haven’t caught it in bloom. Hoping this coming spring my own Soldanellas have flowers. (First hoping they’ve survived.)

Saxifraga hostii

Saxifraga hostii var altissima

Androsace

Androsace villosa var taurica

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Pygmaea isn’t the most spectacular of the Lewisias, but it is easy to grow from seed and reliably hardy. This one has recently received a nutritious deposit of rabbit droppings.

Lewisia pygmaea and nutritious droppings

Lewisia pygmaea and nutritious droppings

This little creeping Veronica has also had a fresh food drop. (Click to enlarge.)

Veronica and rabbit ferilizer

Veronica and rabbit fertilizer

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DSCN0349

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Between the boulders where the delicate plants find protection, hardier Violas, Aquilegias, and Veronicas seed themselves in the gravel.

Aquilegia pyrenaica

Aquilegia pyrenaica

Viola (poss adunca)

Viola (adunca?)

Viola ?

Another Viola

Alpine Veronica

alpine Veronica (bellidiodes?)

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There are Primulas in the alpine garden, of course. Some thrive, like these self-seeded and naturalized P cortusoides, and some need rescue, like this struggling P marginata (?) about to be overwhelmed by rampaging Sempervivum.

Primula cortusoides

Primula cortusoides

Naturalized Primula corutsoides

Naturalized Primula cortusoides

Run!

Run!

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Clematis climb over evergreens on one of the garden’s wooded slopes. On another, a dark red Pulsatilla blooms in a shady spot, days after Pulsatillas in sunnier locations have gone to seed.

Scramblins clematis among the alpine junipers

Scramblins clematis among the alpine junipers

Maroon pulsatilla vulgaris

maroon Pulsatilla vulgaris

Corydalis nobilis

Corydalis nobilis

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There is a wooded area past the pond at the bottom of the garden. Around its edge grow hybrid garden Irises, but also (more natural-looking) shade-loving Primulas, Hosta, Hepatica, Dodecatheon and, a little further back, a plant I had never seen before, Arisaema triphyllum (jack-in-the-pulpit) — along with the Haberlea rhodopensis, one of the highlights of his trip.

Irises lining the pondside path

Irises lining the pondside path

Dodecatheon dentatum

Dodecatheon dentatum

Unnamed woodland resident

Unnamed woodland resident

Arisaema triphyllum

The alpine garden, above the pond, seen through stems of Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

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This entry was posted in alpines, Devonian Botanic Garden, in and around Edmonton, wildlife and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Devonian Botanic Garden, 4th June 2013, part 2

  1. Pingback: Devonian Botanic Garden, 4th June 2013, part 1 | The Plants I Grow

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